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Barb Butler - Her Advocacy is Personal!

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   October 2, 2014 09:38

The Regina Leader-Post has a wonderful story with SBIA Board Member, Barb Butler, talking about her journey with brain injury. it is a fabulous story that everyone should read!

Click here to access the story.

Here Barb Butler (right) is pictured with Regina Chapter Member Gordie Fisher at the 2013 Brain Boogie.

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Brain Boogie - Positive Steps in Motion

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   September 4, 2014 11:44

Boogie for Change in our Communities


For Immediate Release 


All it takes is a fall – or a collision whether you are at home, on the field or on the road – to become one of the 2200 Saskatchewan people who acquire a brain injury each year. 

Brain injury is the NUMBER ONE killer and disabler of children, youth and those under 44.  Brain injury can result from common every day activities and can affect one’s life in a dramatic way with significant changes to personality, abilities and mobility.

The only cure for brain injury is PREVENTION! 

It is for this reason that the Saskatchewan Brain Injury Association strives to prevent brain injuries.  But those who have survived brain injury seek support and programs in their own communities.  The Brain Boogie raises money to make that happen in cities around the province.

The 12th Annual Brain Boogie will be taking place:

September 6, 2014: Saskatoon & Regina

September 13, 2014: Prince Albert

September 20, 2014: Yorkton

The Brain Boogie is a provincial walk-a-thon event to raise money for the programs that support brain injury survivors and their families. Participation in the Brain Boogie by survivors and their families is very strong because survivors value the programs the Brain Boogie supports and they enjoy the sense of community that the event offers.  Some survivors spend the entire year collecting pledges, sometimes a loonie at a time. 

The Brain Boogie consists of a group walk through a designated route, followed by a Family Fun Brain Boogie Celebration with BBQ & other fun activities.  Each location’s event is unique with some offering yoga warm-ups and in Yorkton, a Zumbathon!

Get your boogie on! Join us for the fun while showing your support!

 

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For further information about the Brain Boogie and individual locations, please contact

Glenda James, Executive Director, by email at info_sbia@sasktel.net or by phone at 306.692.7242.

Download the full release: Release - Sept4.pdf (1.08 mb)

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News | Support the Cause

June is Brain Injury Awareness Month powered by Saskatchewan Blue Cross

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   May 29, 2014 13:26

Making the Invisible, Visible

For Immediate Release

Emilia Becker is a 19 year old brain injury survivor. But you wouldn’t know that if you met her because YOU CAN’T SEE A BRAIN INJURY.

That is the theme for the 2014 Brain Injury Awareness Month powered by Saskatchewan Blue Cross in June. It is also the theme of the poster recently released and distributed to hundreds of schools, municipalities, politicians and community groups in Saskatchewan.

Emilia was 11 years old when she acquired a brain injury. It was a sunny, fall day and she was riding in the school bus she had been taking daily for years. But that day the bus collided with a truck.

As a result, Emilia had to adjust to a new reality. She had to relearn basic skills. Simple tasks now took great concentration. Although she has been fortunate in regaining most of her skills, she is not the same person she was before her injury.

Emilia says she often wished she was wearing a cast on her head so that people would remember that she was living and working with a permanent injury – an invisible one, but no less challenging for its lack of visibility.

Emilia very eloquently describes her experience and how a brain injury can affect both an individual and her family. She drew a standing ovation from close to 400 people when she spoke at the annual BHP Billiton Brain Blitz Gala presented by WorkSafe Saskatchewan in Saskatoon last May. This summer, she is telling her story to groups around the province between June and August 2014 in order to raise awareness about brain injury.

Brain injury is the leading cause of disability and death among young people.

Unfortunately, the only cure for brain injury is prevention.

The Saskatchewan Brain Injury Association strives to prevent brain injuries and improve the quality of life for brain injury survivors and their families.

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For more information, please contact Glenda James at 306.692.7242.

Emilia Becker can be contacted for an interview at sbia.education@sasktel.net

Download the Full News Release: BIAM News Release 2014.pdf (130.73 kb)

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BrainLove Launch!

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   January 27, 2014 10:27

The BrainLove Campaign is a partnership between the Saskatchewan Brain Injury Association and the Saskatchewan Royal Purple Association to raise awareness about brain injuries, encourage brain health, and raise funds for ongoing education and prevention programs, as well as support for brain injury survivors and their families.

For Brain Awareness Month in March, we will be collecting donations at your local businesses - a $1 donation can be added to your bill and in return you will receive a BrainLove sticker!

 

You will be able to donate $1 at participating businesses beginning March 3, 2014. 

    
 

 

Connections: Fall 2013

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   September 22, 2013 22:57

The Fall 2013 issue of Connections is now out! Inside you will find a report about the 2013 Brain Boogie with a few photos. As well as information about the fast approaching Fall Retreat. You can register online at www.sbia.ca/fall-retreat.aspx.

Download this issue:

Connections-Fall 2013.pdf (1.02 mb)

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Newsletter

Connections: Summer 2013

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   July 15, 2013 11:25

The latest edition of Connections is ready for you! Inside this issue, you can catch up on past events including reports from the Brain Blitz, Camp, and Brain Injury Awareness Month.

You will also be able to learn about upcoming events, including the Brain Boogie, which is sure to be a blast!

Big shout-out to our Brain Blitz sponsors, and our long-term partners. They are featured on Page 7 of the newsletter. Without them our prevention and education work would not be possible. 

Download the full newsletter

Connections- Summer 2013.pdf (2.64 mb)

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From CBC: Brutal Attack in Hockey in B.C.

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   June 17, 2013 18:33

Here is an article about an incident in BC - it again showcases the need to install respect for not only your own brain and health, but you need to respect other players, as well. Much of the behaviour mentioned in the article is unnecessary and shouldn't be taken lightly.

Click for the CBC Article

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Connections: June 2013

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   June 4, 2013 14:53

Check out our June 2013 e-newsletter!

Click here

 

 

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News | Newsletter

The Long-Term Effects of Brain Injury

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   March 2, 2013 13:56

Researchers from the University of South Florida and colleagues at the James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital studying the long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) using rat models, have found that, overtime, TBI results in progressive brain deterioration characterized by elevated inflammation and suppressed cell regeneration. However, therapeutic intervention, even in the chronic stage of TBI, may still help prevent cell death. 

Their study is published in the current issue of the journal PLOS ONE.

"In the U.S., an estimated 1.7 million people suffer from traumatic brain injury," said Dr. Cesar V. Borlongan, professor and vice chair of the department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair at the University of South Florida (USF). "In addition, TBI is responsible for 52,000 early deaths, accounts for 30 percent of all injury-related deaths, and costs approximately $52 billion yearly to treat."

While TBI is generally considered an acute injury, secondary cell death caused by neuroinflammation and an impaired repair mechanism accompany the injury over time, said the authors. Long-term neurological deficits from TBI related to inflammation may cause more severe secondary injuries and predispose long-term survivors to age-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and post-traumatic dementia. 

Since the U.S. military has been involved in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, the incidence of traumatic brain injury suffered by troops has increased dramatically, primarily from improvised explosive devices (IEDs), according to Martin Steele, Lieutenant General, U.S. Marine Corps (retired), USF associate vice president for veterans research, and executive director of Military Partnerships. In response, the U.S. Veterans Administration has increasingly focused on TBI research and treatment. 

"Progressive injury to hippocampal, cortical and thalamic regions contributes to long-term cognitive damage post-TBI," said study co-author Dr. Paul R. Sanberg, USF senior vice president for research and innovation. "Both military and civilian patients have shown functional and cognitive deficits resulting from TBI." 

Because TBI involves both acute and chronic stages, the researchers noted that animal model research on the chronic stages of TBI could provide insight into identifying therapeutic targets for treatment in the post-acute stage. 

"Using animal models of TBI, our study investigated the prolonged pathological outcomes of TBI in different parts of the brain, such as the dorsal striatum, thalamus, corpus callosum white matter, hippocampus and cerebral peduncle," explained Borlongan, the study's lead author. "We found that a massive neuroinflammation after TBI causes a second wave of cell death that impairs cell proliferation and impedes the brain's regenerative capabilities." 

Upon examining the rat brains eight weeks post-trauma, the researchers found "a significant up-regulation of activated microglia cells, not only in the area of direct trauma, but also in adjacent as well as distant areas." The location of inflammation correlated with the cell loss and impaired cell proliferation researchers observed.

Microglia cells act as the first and main form of immune defense in the central nervous system and make up 20 percent of the total glial cell population within the brain. They are distributed across large regions throughout the brain and spinal cord.

"Our study found that cell proliferation was significantly affected by a cascade of neuroinflammatory events in chronic TBI and we identified the susceptibility of newly formed cells within neurologic niches and suppression of neurological repair," wrote the authors.

The researchers concluded that, while the progressive deterioration of the TBI-affected brain over time suppressed efforts of repair, intervention, even in the chronic stage of TBI injury, could help further deterioration.

 

Article from Science Daily 

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News

Caleb Moore dies after Accident at X-Games

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   February 5, 2013 15:28

Caleb Moore was a Texas kid drawn to the snow, rehearsing complicated tricks on a snowmobile into a foam pit back home until they became second nature and ready for the mountains.

With his younger brother following along and constantly pushing him, Moore became a rising talent in action sports.

The innovative freestyle snowmobile rider, who was hurt in a crash at the Winter X Games in Colorado, died Thursday morning. He was 25.

Moore had been undergoing care at a hospital in Grand Junction since the Jan. 24 crash. Family spokeswoman Chelsea Lawson confirmed his death, the first in the 18-year history of the X Games.

“He lived his life to the fullest. He was an inspiration,” Lawson said.

AA former all-terrain vehicle racer, Moore switched over to snowmobiles as a teenager and quickly rose to the top of the sport. He won four Winter X Games medals, including a bronze last season when his younger brother, Colten, captured gold.

Caleb Moore was attempting a backflip in the freestyle event in Aspen last week when the skis on his 450-pound snowmobile caught the lip of the landing area, sending him flying over the handlebars. Moore landed face first into the snow with his snowmobile rolling over him.

Moore stayed down for quite some time, before walking off with help and going to a hospital to be treated for a concussion. Moore developed bleeding around his heart and was flown to a hospital in Grand Junction for surgery. The family later said that Moore, of Krum, Texas, also had a complication involving his brain.

Colten Moore was injured in a separate crash that same night. He suffered a separated pelvis in the spill.

The family said in a statement they were grateful for all the prayers and support they have received from people around the world.

X Games officials expressed their condolences and said Moore, a four-time X Games medallist, would be remembered “for his natural passion for life and his deep love for his family and friends.”

The Twitter accounts of many athletes from a wide range of sports expressed their sympathy Thursday:

·      New York Jets quarterback Tim Tebow: “So sad to hear about the passing of snowmobiler Caleb Moore. My prayers go out to his younger brother Colten & their entire family.”

·      Freestyle skier Kaya Turski: “The spirit of Caleb Moore will be floating among us forever. RIP.”

·      Surfer Kelly Slater: “Tragic. Don’t even know what to say.”

·      Snowboarder Gretchen Bleiler: “Our world has lost another bright light. Sending my deepest condolences to the family and friends of Caleb Moore.”

·      Tampa Bay third baseman Evan Longoria, who made a visit to Winter X last weekend: “Tragic day for the family of Caleb Moore. Our deepest sympathies go out to all who he influenced and touched. RIP.”

·      Motorsports standout Travis Pastrana: “So sad to hear about Caleb Moore. My condolences and prayers go out to his family and friends.”

·      NASCAR driver Austin Dillon: “Just heard about Caleb Moore. I don’t know what to say other than I’m praying for his family and friends. He was a true Action Sports Hero.”

B.C. Vaught, Caleb Moore’s agent for almost a decade, said he first saw Moore when he was racing an ATV in Minnesota and signed him up to star in some action sports movies.

Later, Moore wanted to make the switch from ATVs to snowmobiles and Vaught helped him. A natural talent, it only took Moore two weeks to master a difficult backflip.

Moore honed his skills in Krum, a town about 5,000 people 50 miles northwest of Dallas that rarely sees snow. Instead, he worked on tricks by launching his sled into a foam pit. After a brief training run on snow ramps in Michigan, he was ready for his sport’s biggest stage — the 2010 Winter X Games.

In that contest, Moore captured a bronze in freestyle and finished sixth in best trick. Two years later, his biography on ESPN said, “Caleb Moore has gone from ‘beginner’s luck’ to ‘serious threat.”’

That was hardly a surprise to Vaught, who said, “Whatever he wanted to do, he did it.”

In that contest, Moore captured a bronze in freestyle and finished sixth in best trick. Two years later, his biography on ESPN said, “Caleb Moore has gone from ‘beginner’s luck’ to ‘serious threat.”’

Vaught said Moore didn’t believe his sport was too extreme, but rather “it was a lifestyle.” He was good at it — along with ATV racing — as he accumulated a garage full of trophies.

Still, Moore’s death is sure to ignite the debate over safety of the discipline. Whether action sports are too dangerous is an issue that’s been raised before.

When freestyle skier Sarah Burke died in a training accident a little more than a year ago in Park City, Utah, there were questions about the halfpipe. Before that, the sport was examined when snowboarder Kevin Pearce suffered a severe brain injury in a fall in the same pipe as Burke two years earlier. Pearce has recovered and served as an analyst at Winter X.

But in general, the athletes accept the risks and defend their disciplines.

Top of Form

Bottom of Form

“I just look at it like this: Yes, we’re in a dangerous sport,” fellow snowmobile rider Levi LaVallee said. “Anytime you’re doing a backflip on anything, it’s dangerous. But we’re training to do this. This is what we practice, what we do day in and day out. We’re comfortable with doing this stuff.”

LaVallee recently described Moore as a “fierce competitor.”

“A very creative mind,” LaVallee said. “I’ve watched him try some crazy, crazy tricks and some of them were successful, some of them not so much. But he was first guy to get back on a sled and go try it again. It shows a lot of heart.”

X Games officials said in a statement that they would conduct a thorough review of freestyle snowmobiling events and adopt any appropriate changes.

“For 18 years, we have worked closely on safety issues with athletes, course designers and other experts. Still, when the world’s best compete at the highest level in any sport, risks remain,” they said, noting that Moore was hurt performing a move he had done several times before.

 

This article is via the National Post.

Other related articles:

The Guardian

USA Today

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