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June is Brain Injury Awareness Month

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   June 4, 2015 14:11
We are so excited the Government of Saskatchewan declared June Brain Injury Awareness month
in the province of Saskatchewan.


‪#‎areyouaware‬ ‪#‎braininjuryawarenessmonth‬ ‪#‎biam‬ ‪#‎skpoli

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Brain Injury - A Ticking Time Bomb

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   November 26, 2011 13:40

It was sad to read about the death of a fellow Zimbabwean, Mbongeni Ndlovu, 28, who died in Oldham, UK. He died from severe head injuries following an alleged assault.

He was taken by ambulance to the Royal Oldham Hospital but police say he refused to co-operate, with suggestions that he may have discharged himself.

The most important question from this tragic story is whether or not there were missed opportunities to save him? His death caused imponderable grief to his family and friends. It also touched the hearts of many people who did not know him before.

Head injury is a ticking time bomb. The main danger of a head injury is bleeding and brain swelling. The earlier the patient is treated, the better the prognosis. Therefore, it is important to recognise the sinister symptoms that could suggest a severe head injury which needs investigations such as head scanning (head CT scan). These include a period of loss of consciousness, drowsiness, worsening headaches, confusion, strange behaviour, speech problems, vomiting particularly in the morning, dizziness,  loss of balance, weakness of an arm or leg, blurring of vision, seeing double, blood oozing from the ear, clear fluid leaking from an ear or nose, deafness and breathing problems.

In view of the fact that the symptoms of a severe head injury may not develop straight away, the victim of a head injury should have someone with them for at least the first 48 hours after the event. Often, assault charges are changed to murder when the assault did not appear to have caused grievous harm at the time of report, then resulted in death from a head injury days to weeks later. Hospitals do not usually discharge someone without some advice and some patients are kept in hospital if there is no one at home to monitor them.

It is advisable not to take alcohol and drugs that cause drowsiness, for example sleeping tablets and strong pain killers. These could confuse the picture.

There are many cases where a victim had contact with either the police or hospital prior to succumbing to a head injury. This appears to be the case with Mbongeni Ndlovu.

In some cases, the sinister symptoms of a severe head injury may not be present at the time of contact, but the mode of injury should arouse suspicion. Lack of co-operation by a victim is frustrating to law enforcement officers, however this could be the only significant symptom suggestive of a severe head injury. When the victim has alcohol on board, their lack of co-operation, violence, confusion, unsteadiness and slurred speech may be attributed to alcohol, only for the victim to be found dead at home or in a prison cell.

In UK, there are reports of a small number of cases (6% of all the deaths in police custody) where the actions of the police were directly attributable to the detainee’s death. Unfortunately, the statistics for head injuries in police custody in Zimbabwe could not be obtained. This is a controversial subject and the police are often accused of brutality, impetuous behaviour, racism and cover-ups.

In some of the cases, the presence of either drugs or alcohol may have played a part by increasing the person’s readiness to resist arrest and reducing their susceptibility to pain. After the hullabaloo and trauma of an arrest, the police should have a duty of care to their detainee and refer him for an assessment by a doctor if a head injury is suspected.

A knock on the head is common and usually there is nothing to worry about. The most common causes of severe head injuries are road traffic accidents, falls and assault. Although head injuries are common, death from head injury is low. Very few patients with head injuries (1-2%) require admission to hospital. Only a minority of patients, about 0.2% of all patients attending accident and emergency departments, with a head injury will die as a result.

The majority of all people who sustain a head injury are male and assaults account for a significant number of those who sustain a head injury (30-50%) and alcohol is involved in a significant number of cases.

If you sustain a head injury and you develop some of the symptoms I have described above, you need to be seen by a doctor urgently.  Your health is your priority, so take care of yourself.

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