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Study Suggests, Pine Tree Extract Helpful in Treating Brain Injury Survivors

posted by SK Brain Injury    |   November 22, 2011 15:26

A new study has suggested that using pine tree extract can help facilitate healing in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients.
Researchers at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) are examining the use of supplements developed from New Zealand pine tree bark. The belief is this extract can possibly aid in improving the cognitive difficulties that often emerge after an individual sustains a TBI.Professor Valery Feigin, Director of AUT’s National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neuroscience, is leading the team of researchers looking at the effects of Enzogenol, which is a Pinus Radiata bark extract, on a group of individuals who sustained a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Enzogenol is the brand name given to the supplements.According to a press release issued today, Fagin said,
“Every day, 90 New Zealanders sustain a brain injury, ranging from mild to severe. Acquired brain injury - including stroke and traumatic brain injury - is the leading cause of disability and death in this country costing our health system an estimated $100 million per year.“Many supplements claim health benefits, however this research is one of very few evidence-based treatments. Until now, there has been a lack of effective medication for mild TBI. Other than brain exercises, there are limited treatments available to improve damage as a result of TBI.”
According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), cognitive issues can emerge in the form of concentration problems, attention difficulties, memory problems and/or orientation problems.Cognitive difficulties are not uncommon after suffering a TBI, whether it be a mild, moderate or severe injury. TBI patients often go through cognitive therapy, sometimes for years, after sustaining a brain injury.For the pilot study, researchers tracked 60 individuals who were experiencing cognitive difficulties, for either a six or 12 week period of time. The goal was to investigate the effectiveness of Enzogenol to see if it made any difference in cognitive deficiencies three to 12 months post-injury.Preliminary results suggest an improvement in daily cognitive functioning.Senior Research Fellow Dr Alice Theadom said in the press release,
“The pilot trial has revealed some promising findings for use of the Enzogenol supplement to improve everyday cognitive failures. We’ll now be looking at conducting a full scale clinical trial to determine the effectiveness.”
In New Zealand "brain injuries caused by stroke, motor vehicle crashes, sports injuries, assaults and falls are the leading cause of disability and death." Brain injuries costs about $NZ100 million ($76.07 million) a year, according to the Herald Sun. In the U.S. an estimated 1.7 million people sustain a TBI annually, of which 52,000 die, 275,000 are hospitalized and 80 percent are treated and released from hospital emergency rooms. These figures do not include those who have not sought treatment, or are unaware they have suffered a TBI, as is often the case with concussions and mild head injuries.The results of this pilot study were given at New Zealand's first national conference on stroke and applied neuroscience. The primary researchers hope to conduct a full scale study to determine the effectiveness of using pine tree bark in connection with TBI treatments.


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