Saskatchewan Brain Injury Association
Find us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Pinterest
Youtube
Instagram
Latest News
 
EventsAbout UsAbout Brain InjuryBrain Injury & SportsHelmetsNews & Information
Brain Injury & Sports: A concussion is a brain injury
Take Brain Injury Out of Play Will You Take The Pledge Concussion Resources Hockey Resources Football Resources Soccer Resources Other Resources
Get The Facts


Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Facts
Concussion Facts

BIA Poster
Download Poster
Concussion Facts
A Concussion... is a BRAIN INJURY


Basic Facts

A concussion is caused by a hit or blow to the head that causes the brain to hit the skull at one or more locations. These hits are determined to be a concussion or mild brain injury, when the effects are not life threatening. However, the effects can still be devastating and have the potential to be long-term.

Check out this video for an overview: Concussions 101

Did You Know?

There are more than 750,000 concussions (or mild brain injuries) each in North America with approximately 6,000 in Saskatchewan each year.

Athletes aged 15-17 are at the highest risk of concussion, and long-term effects due to improper treatment.

You do not have to lose consciousness to suffer a concussion; and many symptoms may take several hours to appear.

After just one concussion you are 4 times more likely to suffer a second concussion.

Concussions can happen in various ways:
  • Colliding with another player in Soccer
  • Falling while doing a lift in Cheerleading
  • Being knocked out in Boxing
  • Getting tackled in Football
  • Head hitting the glass after a hockey hit
  • A rough fall while skiing or snowboarding
Common Concussion Symptoms (just one could mean a concussion):
  • Headache or "pressure" in head
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Dizziness or difficulty keeping balance
  • Double or blurry vision
  • Sensitivity to light or sound
  • Feeling sluggish, foggy, or hazy
  • Difficulty paying attention
  • Memory problems
  • Confusion
Tools for proper diagnosis in sports can be found here

Treating a concussion:
  • Immediate removal from play/physical acitivity
  • Involves complete rest (no brain stimulation at all, this includes no tv, computer, iPod, etc.)
  • Following an appropriate return to play strategy - Learn more here
  • Each concussion is unique, and thus the treatment and healing time is unique to each injury
Ask yourself if you feel 100%. Even if you cannot physically describe why you are not feeling your best, you SHOULD NOT resume play until you do.

Check out the sidebar for more stats, information, downloads, and links.